Remembering Governor George Deukmejian

Former California Governor George Deukmejian passed away yesterday at age 89.  Deukmejian was Governor from 1983-1991 and served on the CalChamber Board from 1992-2000.

CalChamber President Allan Zaremberg, who worked as an advisor and Legislative Secretary to the Governor, issued the following statement:

I am deeply saddened by the loss of Governor George Deukmejian, one of the most popular leaders in California’s history. Governor Deukmejian’s humility, integrity, and passion for doing what was best for California is a model for all who seek public service. He inspired me and many others by his compassion for all Californians, by his commitment that government help those who cannot help themselves, and his empathy for those who suffered political oppression. He served the people through his unparalleled leadership on public safety, quality judicial appointments, fiscal stewardship, response to natural disasters such as the Loma Prieta earthquake, and doing the unexpected including — his effort to create the first assault weapons ban.

From left to right: Governor George Deukmejian and Allan Zaremberg, CalChamber President and CEO

During his time in office, the Governor eliminated a huge deficit without raising taxes, balanced the budget during each of the eight years he was governor, and created a reserve for emergencies.

His policies encouraging job creation and economic growth resulted in over 3 million additional jobs and one of the longest periods of economic prosperity in state history.

Governor Deukmejian made a huge impact on the State of California and on the lives of those of us who had the honor to work with him.

The San Francisco Chronicle carried a wonderful quote about the Governor from his final State of the State address. He said, “like so many others, I became Californian not by birth but by choice. I adopted a state whose opportunities are boundless as its beauty, whose future is as bright as its sunshine, and whose possibilities are as varied as its people.”

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